Tag: history

  • 1977: Tenerife Airport Disaster

    On this date in 1977, 583 people died in the deadliest accident in aviation history. Here are some things you may not have known about the Tenerife Airport Disaster. KLM Flight 4805 from Amsterdam, and Pan Am Flight 1736 from Los Angeles via New York, were both traveling to Gran Canaria Airport at Las Palmas […]

  • An All-New Abbreviated Thursday Show!

    We’ll start off with a random trivia question: What university was founded on this date in 1868? Today is World Meteorological Day, Day of Hungarian-Polish Friendship, and Day of the Sea in Bolivia. It’s unofficially National Puppy Day, National Chip and Dip Day, and National Melba Toast Day. It’s the birthday of actress Joan Crawford, […]

  • 1894: The First Stanley Cup Playoff

    On this date in 1894, the first Stanley Cup playoff game was held. Here are a few things you may not have known about the oldest trophy in North American professional team sports. The cup was commissioned as the Dominion Hockey Challenge Cup by Lord Stanley of Preston, who was then the governor general of […]

  • A New Abbreviated Tuesday Show!

    We’ll start off with a random trivia question: What is the largest city named after a U.S. President? Today is International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, International Color Day, International Day of Forests, World Down Syndrome Day, World Poetry Day and World Puppetry Day. It’s Independence Day in Namibia, and Human Rights Day […]

  • Iditarod: Racing Across Alaska

    On this date in 1985, Libby Riddles became the first woman to win the Iditarod Trail sled dog race. Here are some things you might not have known about the annual tradition. The Iditarod is run in honor of the 1925 serum run, which was a sled dog relay to deliver a diphtheria antitoxin to […]

  • St. Patrick’s Day: Common Misconceptions

    Today is St. Patrick’s Day. Here are some things you should know. While a four-leaf clover may be lucky, it’s not a shamrock. Shamrocks have three leaves and are more common than their quad-leaved brethren. It’s said that St. Patrick used the three leaves of the shamrock to help explain the Christian Holy Trinity to […]

  • 1820: Maine, America’s Vacationland

    On this date in 1820, Maine was admitted to the Union. Here are some things you may not have known about the 23rd state. The first inhabitants of what would become Maine was a loose confederacy of Algonquin-speaking people, called the Wabanaki. The first European contact came about 800 years ago when Norwegians arrived on […]

  • March 14, 2017: A Tuesday Short Show

    For the foreseeable future, we’ll be scaling back our episodes on Tuesdays and Thursdays. We’ll still bring you all the features that usually run in the second half of the show. Today is Pi Day, in celebration of the mathematical constant pi, the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter. In several Asian countries, […]

  • 1930: Pluto Discovered, Controversy Ensues

    On this date in 1930, the dwarf planet Pluto was discovered. Here are some things you may not have known about what was once considered the ninth planet in the solar system. Although it wasn’t discovered until 1930, astronomers had predicted in the late 19th century that something besides the newly discovered Neptune was disturbing […]

  • 1926: Book of the Month Club Starts Delivering

    On this date in 1926, the first Book of the Month Club selection was published. Here are some things you might not have known about it. The Book of the Month Club was founded by Harry Scherman in New York. Scherman had earlier success selling a collection of 30 leather-bound books for just under $3. […]